Dr. Timothy Hagen, a lecturer in the Economics attended the 47th Annual Conference of the Urban Affairs Association in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the USA

April 26th, 2017

Dr. Timothy Hagen, a lecturer in the Economics attended the 47th Annual Conference of the Urban Affairs Association in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the USA

Dr. Timothy Hagen, a lecturer in the Economics attended the 47th Annual Conference of the Urban Affairs Association in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the USA

Creating Global Cities of Refuge: Economics Faculty Member Presents Paper at the Urban Affairs Association Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Dr. Timothy Hagen, a lecturer in the Economics Department at Epoka University, recently presented his paper, “Creating Global Cities of Refuge: Moonshot Innovation for Refugee Well-Being,” at the 47th Annual Conference of the Urban Affairs Association in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the USA on 21 April 2017.

Dr. Hagen’s paper addressed the issue of protracted refugee situations and long-term encampment, contexts in which refugees are confined for extended periods to refugee camps with severe limitations on the right to work and freedom of movement. While Dr. Hagen advocated working for traditional durable solutions, including the return of refugees to their home countries with the establishment of peace in such countries, the integration of refugees in host country communities, or the resettlement of refugees into third countries, he also advocated the creation of a global network of cities of refuge that are specifically designed to provide economic opportunities, freedom of movement,  and the ensuing dignity and hope that come with such opportunity and freedom. In his paper, Dr. Hagen drew on the economist Paul Romer’s ideas of charter cities as engines of economic growth and on a number of emerging voices advocating the development of such cities as a means of fostering opportunity and dignity for refugees. Dr. Hagen further argued that technologies being developed to sustainably support humans in inhospitable environments could also be used to create such cities in areas where conflicts over existing resources could be minimized. The goal of such cities is ultimately to improve the lives of refugees and of others who may also be attracted to innovative new cities that prioritize sustainability and human well-being.